Are you sick and tired of your strategy implementation falling short of your intended results?

Deep in your heart, you know there’s a way to bridge the gap between ‘your strategy’ and its ‘day-to-day implementation.’ You are painfully aware of the importance of your strategy’s implementation for your company’s continued growth and sustained profitability.

What is strategy?

Your strategy is your plan identifying the marketplace in which you choose will   compete, what you will define as ‘a win’, and how you will maximize your company’s long-term value. No matter how well conceived your strategy is, your strategy is worthless when others in the company misinterpret your strategy, block your strategy, or simply do not know how to act on your strategy.

Your ‘Strategy Roadmap’

Your strategy needs a framework or ‘roadmap’ for guiding the mobilization of your company to implement your strategy. Your ‘strategy roadmap’ makes strategy actionable while enabling your employees to clearly understand:

  • What decisions need to be made in support of the action?
  • Where action is needed?

  • What decisions need to be made in support of the action?
  • Who needs to make those decisions?
  • When do the decisions need to be made?

    Your strategy roadmap will acknowledge the inter-dependencies of the various operating components required for your success. Your ‘strategy roadmap’ serves as your guide for implementing your strategy. Your ‘strategy roadmap’ facilitates turning strategic intent into business results.

     The ‘What’ and ‘How’ of a ‘Strategy Roadmap’

    Typical business strategy focuses only on ‘the what’ of strategy and not ‘the how’ of strategy. For employees to act on a strategy, a ‘strategy roadmap’ needs to be expressed as an integrated set of objectives and measures needed for successful implementation.

    Top down strategy, delivered to the masses for execution, must give way to a CEO to frontline collaborative development. Why, executives are not in the trenches and generally have no clue what the frontline sees each day.

    ‘CEO to Frontline’ strategy development

     

    Involving your frontline in the development of your ‘strategy roadmap,’ not only makes sense, but you will also gain the ‘buy-in’ of those individuals charged with the ‘nuts and bolts’ implementation of your company’s strategy.

    Your ‘strategy roadmap’ provides you a competitive advantage to guide your agile team to a win that’s; better, faster, and cheaper than what your competitors attempt. Keep reading if you want to know how to make your ‘strategy roadmap,’ happen.

    It’s time to adopt a new mindset

    Your frontline now is to become the ‘Co-creators’ of your overall strategy! Your Co-creators will be the vital link by helping the senior team develop ‘the how’ of your company’s strategy.

    I like to refer to the ‘what’ portion of your strategy as, ‘Business Strategy’ and the ‘how’ portion of your strategy as, ‘Co-creator Strategy.’ Your ‘Co-creator strategy’ takes your ‘business strategy’ and develops the framework identifying the:

    • Who,
    • How,
    • When,
    • Where, and
    • Behavioral expectations required to implement the strategy.

    Companies don’t execute strategy, people do.

    What’s involved in a Co-creator Strategy?

    A Co-creator strategy provides the framework of systems, processes, and behavioral expectations necessary to implement your strategy. Unless your employee’s beliefs and behaviors align with the beliefs and behaviors required to implement your strategy, you are leaving money on the table by planting the seeds for ‘resource waste.’

    The wider the gap between your employee’s beliefs and behaviors and the beliefs and behaviors required for strategy implementation, the more money you are leaving on the table from wasted resources.

    The four components of a Co-creator strategy

    Your Co-creator strategy will have the following four components:

    1. Identify company values to be ‘lived’ as the norm.
    2. Define working environment necessary for employees to succeed and thrive
    3. Create a talent sustainability process for the on-boarding, growth and development of employees
    4. Align company strategy, culture, and operating model with an ever-changing marketplace

     

     

    1. Identify company values to be ‘lived’ as the norm.

    pinpoints the key behaviors to be modeled and embedded throughout the company.

    I am not talking about posters on the walls, slogans on company stationary, nor coffee cups or other trinkets. I am talking actual daily behaviors exhibited from the front office to the front line.

     

    1. Define working environment necessary for employees to succeed and thrive

    This is best accomplished with the development of a set of ‘Working Agreements.’ The working agreement is written documents which outlines how we agree to work with each other.

    This document serves as agreed upon behavioral standards all are accountable to upholding. Disciplinary action up to and including termination are the consequences for working agreement violations.”

    1. Create a talent sustainability process for the on-boarding, growth and development of employees

    Succession planning, adjustment resulting from turnover, and bringing new employees on board requires a process for the on-boarding, growth and development of employees. What are the systems, processes, and metrics that need to be in-place for long term success?

    1. Align company strategy, culture, and operating model with an ever-changing marketplace

    Having the ability as a company to quickly adapt to changing customer demands, technological advancements, regulatory restrictions, and emerging competitors, gives your company a competitive advantage as you can response faster to the ongoing markets shifts.

    Keeping your strategy, culture, and operating model in alignment is a must if your goals is to achieve sustained results in uncertain markets.